Rim guard for tire changing.

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JayF
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Rim guard for tire changing.

Post by JayF » Mon Dec 04, 2023 10:42 am

I attempted a first time DIY tire removal on my 2021 Gear-Up. The Hidenau k37 pusher was as bald as I am at around 3,000 miles. I had bought a set of tire spoons with accessories to do a lawn tractor tire a while ago, but never got to do it yet.

So I figured I'd try my hand ad dismounting the tire myself. I usually take them to a shop near me, but it closed and the next closest is about 40 minutes away and require me to drop off the rim/tire and I'd have to pick it up the next day. Making two trips there for a tire is a bit of a pain.

Here's the kit I bought: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0886JFFHH?ps ... ct_details It took a bit of work, but I did manage to get it off. A few small blocks of wood to hold the tire in the center of the rim was the key. I just sat the rim on the garage floor on an old piece of carpet and used a few sprays of silicone lube and after about an hour (took a bit to get the tube out too) I was done.

Here's the issue, I used the rim protector/guards but at some point, the levering action against them pinched a few small holes because they're basically a rubbery plastic material. This cause a few minor chips on the rim, which were easy to cover with the black touch-up paint that came with the bike.

I think that I need something a bit tougher to protect the rims the next time (or during mounting of the new tire). Does anyone have any suggestions on where I can buy a more durable set? I read somewhere that a used piece of garden hose can be split and those things can be pretty tough.

I think next time I'll put the tire in a warmer area (my garage was about 50F) to soften it a bit, but I hear those Heidenau k37 are about as stiff as they come anyways. I have watched several YouTube videos of people changing dirt bike tires (I watched these because they are tube tires with spoked rims) but apparently they are MUCH, MUCH softer because they guys flip just a bit off the rim and can mostly just push the rest of the tire off the rim. Not happening on my Ural tires! Any additional hints are appreciated.
Squeezed between OH and PA (northern panhandle of WV).
Current Rides: 2021 Gear-Up Sahara, 2006 Honda Goldwing audio/comfort w/ escapade trailer
Past Rides: 1996 Kawasaki (EN500) Vulcan, 1990 Yamaha Radian (YX600), 1980 Kawasaki 550 LTD.

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Re: Rim guard for tire changing.

Post by Snakeoil » Mon Dec 04, 2023 11:53 am

First, don't use silicone as lube to mount or dismount tires. It remain on the surface and can cause your tire to spin on the rim and shear the valve stem. They make tire lube for a reason and you can buy it in places like NAPA. It's a better choice. Even soapy water can come back to bite you if you ride in the rain.

As for your rim protectors, the root cause of your problem are those tire irons you bought. They have round shanks instead of flat. Yes, they flatten out a bit when you get closer to the business end, but they are still shaped so that they concentrate the force on a small point of contact which is why you went thru your rim protectors.

I bought rim protectors many years ago and still have the original set. They are made from nylon, which is pretty tough. But they have taken a beating over the years and probably should be replaced.

I own flat tire irons, but have since made a copy of the N0-MAR tool, which does not require any type of protection as no metal comes in contact with the rim. You do need a tire machine to hold the rim while using the N0-MAR tool, however.
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Re: Rim guard for tire changing.

Post by JayF » Mon Dec 04, 2023 12:14 pm

Snakeoil wrote:
Mon Dec 04, 2023 11:53 am
First, don't use silicone as lube to mount or dismount tires. It remain on the surface and can cause your tire to spin on the rim and shear the valve stem. They make tire lube for a reason and you can buy it in places like NAPA. It's a better choice. Even soapy water can come back to bite you if you ride in the rain.

As for your rim protectors, the root cause of your problem are those tire irons you bought. They have round shanks instead of flat. Yes, they flatten out a bit when you get closer to the business end, but they are still shaped so that they concentrate the force on a small point of contact which is why you went thru your rim protectors.

I bought rim protectors many years ago and still have the original set. They are made from nylon, which is pretty tough. But they have taken a beating over the years and probably should be replaced.

I own flat tire irons, but have since made a copy of the N0-MAR tool, which does not require any type of protection as no metal comes in contact with the rim. You do need a tire machine to hold the rim while using the N0-MAR tool, however.
I'll pick up some proper lube from NAPA. I planned on cleaning up the rim before I mount my new tire (which I just ordered). I see what you mean about the spoons. I'm looking at this kit, which I believe is what you're talking about. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B098D ... 2UVW&psc=1 I think that these being flat, having protection on them and coming with rim protectors should do a good job.
Squeezed between OH and PA (northern panhandle of WV).
Current Rides: 2021 Gear-Up Sahara, 2006 Honda Goldwing audio/comfort w/ escapade trailer
Past Rides: 1996 Kawasaki (EN500) Vulcan, 1990 Yamaha Radian (YX600), 1980 Kawasaki 550 LTD.

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Re: Rim guard for tire changing.

Post by bratmanxj » Mon Dec 04, 2023 1:18 pm

JayF wrote:
Mon Dec 04, 2023 12:14 pm
I'll pick up some proper lube from NAPA. I planned on cleaning up the rim before I mount my new tire (which I just ordered). I see what you mean about the spoons. I'm looking at this kit, which I believe is what you're talking about. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B098D ... 2UVW&psc=1 I think that these being flat, having protection on them and coming with rim protectors should do a good job.
My Motion Pro tire irons (https://a.co/d/6531zBI) have the same "round" shape as the kit you specs and I've used them on a variety of tires (motorcycles, lawn eqpt, trailers, etc.) with out much issues. The 2nd set you listed don't have the rounded spoon face and I've had issues using those types on tube-type tires and pinching the tube. I only pull those out of the drawer when doing a trailer tire and need the extra leverage of my longer irons.

I have a few of those cheap poly-rubber clip on rim protectors and every single one of them is deformed and dented. Pick up a good set of the Motion Pro rim protectors (https://a.co/d/i6oycPW).

Either way... I do my own Duro 307s but will bring my K28s into the shop to have them machine mounted. My touring bike, I make sure to put the tire out in the sun or in front of my torpedo heater and get the rubber warm before trying to mount.
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Re: Rim guard for tire changing.

Post by Tomcatfixer » Mon Dec 04, 2023 2:25 pm

I change a fair amount of tires between all of my bikes and the ones I change for others. What I've found works for me is this MotionPro tire iron set...

Screenshot_20231204_131234_DuckDuckGo.jpg

... these MotionPro rim protectors...

Screenshot_20231204_131310_DuckDuckGo.jpg

... RU-Glyde tire lubricant...

Screenshot_20231204_131506_DuckDuckGo.jpg

...an inner tube valve puller similar to this, but mine is a chain with a finger loop on the end. I can't find a link to one like mine...

Screenshot_20231204_132132_DuckDuckGo.jpg

...and, of course, the vaunted Baja No-Pinch Tool...

Screenshot_20231204_132331_DuckDuckGo.jpg
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Re: Rim guard for tire changing.

Post by Snakeoil » Mon Dec 04, 2023 3:49 pm

Yes, those flat irons are what I use. I have a short set and a long set. No armor on mine, though.

I've never mounted or dismounted a K28 so cannot speak to the difficulty. But I've read my share of complaints here about the stiff sidewalls. I've had some tires just about fall onto the rims and others fight me for longer than I would care to admit. But as a general rule, if you take your time, do it per prescribed methods, pretty much all tires will go on with not too much effort.

My friend has a bike shop he runs under the radar behind his house. He's a former BMW tech and was a service manager at a dealer until he could not live with what he called "selling lies" at BMW. He's retired now, but in great shape and just loves to wrench. When he built his shop, he bought a brand new tire machine and balancer. So for some tires, I just go to him and we chew the fat about bikes and cars. With that machine he can slap a new tire on a rim for my Harley in seconds.

Chad, I've heard nothing but positive things about the Baja tool. If I did not already have the HF tire machine that I modified and the No-Mar tool, I'd probably get one of those.
Regards,
Rob
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Re: Rim guard for tire changing.

Post by n3303j » Tue Dec 05, 2023 12:42 pm

If your bike has the spare tire rack on the sidecar trunk that is the ideal place to break down and mount tires. Sure beats the floor on your knees.
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Re: Rim guard for tire changing.

Post by tgtrotter » Tue Dec 05, 2023 3:03 pm

The last and only time I dismounted 4 new K37s and mounted 308s I used those cheap Amazon rounded spoons. Those squared ones I never feel I can get enough bite with. Just me. I sparingly used diluted soap in a spray bottle.

For holding it down, under the wheel a folded in quarters heavy duty moving blanket on my F350 tail gate was perfect height for me. I'm talking a big thick Vanliner blanket that the wheel nestled into well.

Taking the first K37 off took me an hour swearing. The next about half that. By the time I was installing the easier 308s , less than 5 mins each.

Working at the right comfortable height for the job is imperative for me.
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Re: Rim guard for tire changing.

Post by Stevie » Tue Dec 05, 2023 6:15 pm

I've used these a couple of times with success:

https://www.amazon.com/KIPA-Protectors- ... 174&sr=8-9

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Re: Rim guard for tire changing.

Post by Canadian FJR » Tue Dec 05, 2023 9:50 pm

As far as lubricant, I found a combination of liquid dish detergent and a spray of glass cleaner.


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Re: Rim guard for tire changing.

Post by Rover » Tue Dec 05, 2023 10:00 pm

For those using the Baja tool, what size axle are you using? The form search says 20mm is the axle size (Claus) but the Baja site lists 20mm for the front and 24mm for the back. https://www.bajanopinch.com/bikes-axle-size-list/

If so does the 20mm work for both since Baja only makes 15 17, 20, and 25 mm axles? They don't recommend using a smaller size but if indeed the rear axle is 24mm what choice is there?

Maybe Baja is wrong?

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Re: Rim guard for tire changing.

Post by Tomcatfixer » Tue Dec 05, 2023 10:05 pm

All three of the Urals axles are 20mm, since all four wheels are interchangable. You need only order a Baja No-Pinch tool with it's default 20mm shaft.
- Chad

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2015 cT "Mobile Chernobyl", 2003 Retro Solo, 2001 Patrol "Little Red Bear", 1999 Tourist "The RPOC", 1994 Honda VFR750F

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1993 Honda CBR600F2 - 1984 Yamaha FJ1100
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Re: Rim guard for tire changing.

Post by stagewex » Tue Dec 05, 2023 10:27 pm

Motion Pro rim protectors and spoons. Ya certainly need three (3) if you are mounting or un-mounting K37's.
The set of Duro 307's I have on the rig right now... I thought there was something wrong they were like butter to install. Especially after a K37.
Same as mounting a 606 on a 2 wheeler.
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Re: Rim guard for tire changing.

Post by Rover » Wed Dec 06, 2023 1:48 pm

Thanks Chad. That totally makes sense, I figured maybe something was not right with the Baja data.

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Re: Rim guard for tire changing.

Post by JayF » Wed Dec 06, 2023 11:44 pm

Well, after about 2 hours and with weeping, wailing and great gnashing of teeth, I've changed my first tire. I confess the K37 was replace by a duro 308, just basically because I do 95% street riding and I'm hoping to see what mileage I'll get out of it. Not to mention it's literally 1/2 the cost of the Heidenau k37. My new spoons haven't come, but I was able to be careful enough with what I had that I didn't scratch up anything this time. What seemed to get me the most is that the tire didn't want to go into the center drop zone. Also, I think I didn't go heavy enough on the tire lube to start. I started by putting the first side over the rim first with the tube inflated just enough to hold shape in the tire. It was difficult to get the spoons angled so they could flip the edge over the rim. I think I'll look into one of those bent looking spoons for next time. It was a bit stressful, but I watched several YouTube videos and the one stressed that if you're working too hard on the tire, it's not placed correctly in the center drop zone of the rim. I did it on the floor of my heated garage, because the Ural is in a cold garage and I wanted the tire warmer. I saved myself about $30 and 50 miles of driving (in my F-250, that's about $15 in gas). I feel like the next change will be easier due to practice. Now, I'm just waiting on a new donut and rear brake pads. Thanks for all the help and answers. God Bless.
Squeezed between OH and PA (northern panhandle of WV).
Current Rides: 2021 Gear-Up Sahara, 2006 Honda Goldwing audio/comfort w/ escapade trailer
Past Rides: 1996 Kawasaki (EN500) Vulcan, 1990 Yamaha Radian (YX600), 1980 Kawasaki 550 LTD.

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