Cover and raise your brake pedal

The "Pimp my Ride" section for Soviet bloc bikes. Everybody seems to have their own custom add-ons, modifications & accessories. Share your tips and post pictures of them here.
Forum rules
This is the place for topics concerining modifying and accessorizing your Ural or Denpr.

Cover and raise your brake pedal

Postby hunkyjohn » Wed Aug 06, 2008 3:23 pm

Here's a low-cost but very effective brake pedal cover. Only three parts are needed: 1. A cushioned/threaded steel furniture glide; 2. A nut to thread on to the glide; 3. A rubber crutch tip.

I found my glide in the junk bin, but they, as well as the rubber tips, are available from Ace Hardware. Just make sure the tip will fit snugly over the installed glide.

Drill a hole in the brake pedal aft of the actuator rod that lives under the pedal. Bolt the glide in place.

Measure the height of the glide as it sits above the pedal. Measure the inside depth of the rubber tip. Cut off the difference between the inside depth of the tip and the hight of the installed glide. The picture shows how much I had to cut off.

Test the fit of the tip (now called a pedal cover), and if all is well, glue the cover over the glide. I used Shoe Goo.

The picture shows some cross-hatching I sawed into the pedal cover but that is not necessary.

The cover may look small, but it works perfectly.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
hunkyjohn
New Member
New Member
 
Posts: 15
Joined: Thu Nov 29, 2007 9:16 am

Re: Cover and raise your brake pedal

Postby kokigamsky » Wed Aug 06, 2008 5:20 pm

hunkyjohn wrote:Here's a low-cost but very effective brake pedal cover. Only three parts are needed: 1. A cushioned/threaded steel furniture glide; 2. A nut to thread on to the glide; 3. A rubber crutch tip.

I found my glide in the junk bin, but they, as well as the rubber tips, are available from Ace Hardware. Just make sure the tip will fit snugly over the installed glide.

Drill a hole in the brake pedal aft of the actuator rod that lives under the pedal. Bolt the glide in place.

Measure the height of the glide as it sits above the pedal. Measure the inside depth of the rubber tip. Cut off the difference between the inside depth of the tip and the hight of the installed glide. The picture shows how much I had to cut off.

Test the fit of the tip (now called a pedal cover), and if all is well, glue the cover over the glide. I used Shoe Goo.

The picture shows some cross-hatching I sawed into the pedal cover but that is not necessary.

The cover may look small, but it works perfectly.
this is nice. I was finding that using the foot brake was a real pain.
User avatar
kokigamsky
Party Member
Party Member
 
Posts: 215
Joined: Thu Jul 10, 2008 12:49 am
Location: Duluth area, only in Wisconsin

Postby Ragman » Wed Aug 06, 2008 8:34 pm

Brilliant idea, thank you
Милаж
I'm kind of broken now.
2012 Can Am Spyder - Bright Red
Gone Now:
2011 Урал 'Готовьтесь' - лес Камуфляж
2010 but New Yamaha TW 200
2005 Урал Турист- Black - converted to 2wd . missed very much. * 2002 Yamaha TW 200 - 1999 Royal Enfield Bullet - . * many others lost in the fog of time.
User avatar
Ragman
Order of Suvarov
Order of Suvarov
 
Posts: 4460
Joined: Wed Jul 18, 2007 9:58 pm
Location: Rogersville, TN

Re: Cover and raise your brake pedal

Postby IRON NUTZ » Wed Aug 06, 2008 9:10 pm

kokigamsky wrote:
hunkyjohn wrote:Here's a low-cost but very effective brake pedal cover. Only three parts are needed: 1. A cushioned/threaded steel furniture glide; 2. A nut to thread on to the glide; 3. A rubber crutch tip.

I found my glide in the junk bin, but they, as well as the rubber tips, are available from Ace Hardware. Just make sure the tip will fit snugly over the installed glide.

Drill a hole in the brake pedal aft of the actuator rod that lives under the pedal. Bolt the glide in place.

Measure the height of the glide as it sits above the pedal. Measure the inside depth of the rubber tip. Cut off the difference between the inside depth of the tip and the hight of the installed glide. The picture shows how much I had to cut off.

Test the fit of the tip (now called a pedal cover), and if all is well, glue the cover over the glide. I used Shoe Goo.

The picture shows some cross-hatching I sawed into the pedal cover but that is not necessary.

The cover may look small, but it works perfectly.
this is nice. I was finding that using the foot brake was a real pain.
i covered that mod in one easy step ,two months ago using an hardly-davidson oval knuclehead nos foot clutch pedal that bolts on ,bought off e-bay and installed by myself
along w/an extended foot peg that compliments and completes the ergonomics(ease and feel of use) it lacked
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
EVERY THING OLD IS NEW AGAIN,OR IS IT
EVERYTHING NEW IS OLD AGAIN,I GUESS ON URALS ITS BOTH
2000 bavarian classic w/sc
User avatar
IRON NUTZ
Comrade Colonel
Comrade Colonel
 
Posts: 478
Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2008 11:56 pm
Location: newburgh,ny/mid-hudson valley

Postby pidgey » Thu Aug 07, 2008 12:53 am

Excellent idea, sir. Will probably give that one a try. 8)
2005 BMW K1200S with Hannigan SuperSport chair
2007 Suzuki Boulevard S83
2010 Patrol (the lemon) SOLD

Image
User avatar
pidgey
Order of Lenin
Order of Lenin
 
Posts: 2411
Joined: Sun Dec 02, 2007 4:54 pm
Location: Pigeon Lake Alberta

Postby vincent-rapide » Thu Sep 25, 2008 12:12 am

I was checking the archives to see what everyone else was doing about the marginal rear braking. Getting some pressure on the pedal is a good start. I will add a rubber pad of some sort as well; in the meantime, here's what I came up with to help the problem... A personal preference on my part no doubt, but the rear brake pedal on my 07 GUp sits too low in relationship to the right footpeg, making it difficult to get a decent angle on it with my foot. I wanted to get the pedal up higher so as to allow maximum effective pedal travel when braking.
The pedal has no height adjustment; it bump stops against the underside of the right footpeg on return travel.

Even with both the rear and sidecar brakes adjusted to remove all slack in the linkage, and the brake lever arms set at right angles to maximize leverage of the cams against the shoes, when applying the rear brake, the pedal travel distance is so great that I can’t push it far enough with the toe of my boot to develop sufficient pressure.

And with the rear brake’s odd assortment of levers and linkage that don’t seem to produce much pressure between shoe and drum anyway, the whole linkage system is on the verge of going "over center" or at least is operating at inefficient leverage angles...every bit of effective brake lever travel is needed

To raise the pedal, I cut a diagonal slot across the underside of the right footpeg rubber using the impression made by the brake lever as it stops against it as the pattern. I was able to bring the lever up by at least 6mm by cutting the slot in the rubber (did not cut all the way through to the center of the peg rubber, just made a deep slot).

This slot in the rubber peg put the pedal level slightly above the top of the foot peg, which allows greater foot pressure to be applied sooner to maximize the most effective portion of the brake pedal’s travel. After taking up the resulting slack in the linkage from the raised pedal, the brake action seems much improved.

QUESTION: Has anyone developed a more effective linkage plate to replace “Lever, p/n 63-11421”........a plate with modified"lever arms" that could allow more leverage from the pedal? (or is it more likely some other part of the linkage will fail if increased loads are placed on the system)?
M4900 Kubota tractor
1994 Chevy S-10 4wd
1988 Chevy Suburban 4wd complete with factory Delco CB radio(....oops, just sold it)
1983 Isuzu Diesel PU
1970 Gamma Goat (finally sold the Goat, but I still have the stories)
1951 Norton International (in progress)
1951 Vincent Touring Rapide
1942 BSA WM-20 (uprated to M21 spec. 15hp)
1961 BSA A10 "Royal Tourist" (really)
And, lest we forget.... 2007 GearUp (Desert Camo "punkin orange")
User avatar
vincent-rapide
Hero of the Soviet Union - 2014
Hero of the Soviet Union - 2014
 
Posts: 325
Joined: Sun Jun 01, 2008 2:54 am
Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico & Medina, Texas

Postby Gautrek » Thu Sep 25, 2008 5:03 pm

Apparently one way of improving single cam type brakes.Is to remove around 1 1/2" of the brake material from the brake shoe which is trailing.IE the one that isn't doing a lot once you apply the brake.The trailing brake shoe actually stops the leading shoe being applied.So by removing this amount it helps the "leading" shoe to contact the drum better.
I must admit i haven't tried this yet as i don't want to knacker a good set of shoes up.But if i can get another set i may try it.Any help at all in the brake dept is good.
Any body else heard this?
1983 R80 BMW

1975 M66 Ural outfit.

1937 350 Red Panther

A Russian bike website and forum .

http://www.russianbike.co.uk/
User avatar
Gautrek
Comrade General
Comrade General
 
Posts: 912
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2008 4:03 pm
Location: England

Rear brake improvement

Postby DALESMAN » Thu Sep 25, 2008 5:55 pm

In reply to Vincent-Rapides query about a modified brake lever/fulcrum,you can find one if you Google the F2 Motorcycles website(English dealer) who has developed a fulcrum for the rear brake with different characteristics from the original,which is supposed to achieve better leverage.I have not tried one yet but will probably do so soon.
There is lots of other good stuff too:idea:
DALESMAN
Comrade Colonel
Comrade Colonel
 
Posts: 292
Joined: Sun Jan 20, 2008 6:07 pm
Location: Birmingham,England

Re: Rear brake improvement

Postby a1930ford » Thu Sep 25, 2008 6:08 pm

:lurker:
Last edited by a1930ford on Mon Oct 08, 2012 4:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"There is a reason Dogs do not live as long as we do. They are your Resume' in Heaven."

2005 Troyka - Arlington, TX.
User avatar
a1930ford
Order of Victory
Order of Victory
 
Posts: 7931
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2007 3:58 pm
Location: Wichita Falls, TX.

Postby vincent-rapide » Fri Sep 26, 2008 10:14 am

Thanks Gents,

I like the idea on the trailing shoe modification, thank you.... and I will check out F-2's website... for ideas, at least...as was pointed out the dollar is not held dear in the UK these days!

Actually, for the modified fulcrum; it's a simple piece that could be made from a triangle-shaped piece of 3/8 flat stock... drill three holes and you're there....or so it would seem. Having someone else do the homework on optimal demensions would be the ticket. But, trial and error would work for this application.

Along the lines of the trailing shoe modification; I did center the brake shoes on the backing plates relative to the axle centers. This slight adjustment to the shoe position helps noticably...

Cheers,

VR
M4900 Kubota tractor
1994 Chevy S-10 4wd
1988 Chevy Suburban 4wd complete with factory Delco CB radio(....oops, just sold it)
1983 Isuzu Diesel PU
1970 Gamma Goat (finally sold the Goat, but I still have the stories)
1951 Norton International (in progress)
1951 Vincent Touring Rapide
1942 BSA WM-20 (uprated to M21 spec. 15hp)
1961 BSA A10 "Royal Tourist" (really)
And, lest we forget.... 2007 GearUp (Desert Camo "punkin orange")
User avatar
vincent-rapide
Hero of the Soviet Union - 2014
Hero of the Soviet Union - 2014
 
Posts: 325
Joined: Sun Jun 01, 2008 2:54 am
Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico & Medina, Texas

Postby Gautrek » Fri Sep 26, 2008 10:49 am

vincent-rapide wrote:

Along the lines of the trailing shoe modification; I did centre the brake shoes on the backing plates relative to the axle centres. This slight adjustment to the shoe position helps noticeably...



VR

This mod was mentioned in a Vintage motorcycle magazine.
The guy said that once he had done this to his bike the brake would stall the roller used to check brakes for the yearly MOT over here.It makes sense if you think about it.Just as getting the brake shoes as central as possible would help.

Oh and by the way i have spelt "centres" properly for you in the above quote.You Yanks must learn how to spell correctly. :P
1983 R80 BMW

1975 M66 Ural outfit.

1937 350 Red Panther

A Russian bike website and forum .

http://www.russianbike.co.uk/
User avatar
Gautrek
Comrade General
Comrade General
 
Posts: 912
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2008 4:03 pm
Location: England

Postby LeeSteel » Fri Sep 26, 2008 11:36 am

The "Equal Distance Brake Lever" listed on the F2 site. Is that a legitimate problem/solution?

http://www.f2motorcycles.ltd.uk/uralengineupgrades.html

Says: All Urals built before 2008 have a lever fitted to the rear brake mechanism that has unequal lengths between the holes. With the old lever you can either have large pedal movement or (if you turn it round) large pedal pressure to operate the rear brake. This lever has equally spaced holes so the pedal travel and pressure are improved.

And so what if you turned it around for more pressure?
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
2006 Patrol
http://www.leesteel.com

"A burn on the arm is worth two in the bush!"
User avatar
LeeSteel
Comrade Colonel
Comrade Colonel
 
Posts: 306
Joined: Mon Jun 02, 2008 8:19 am
Location: Newington, Connecticut

Postby a1930ford » Fri Sep 26, 2008 2:22 pm

:lurker:
Last edited by a1930ford on Mon Oct 08, 2012 4:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"There is a reason Dogs do not live as long as we do. They are your Resume' in Heaven."

2005 Troyka - Arlington, TX.
User avatar
a1930ford
Order of Victory
Order of Victory
 
Posts: 7931
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2007 3:58 pm
Location: Wichita Falls, TX.

Postby vincent-rapide » Fri Sep 26, 2008 8:32 pm

Gentlemen,

Thanks for the feedback on this. Your responses have given me some ideas on how to proceed. I think I will try to make my own fulcrum plate using the original as a pattern and then making the both legs the same (longer of the two) length. I'll see if can find some stock in the shop; should not need much, it's a smallish part..... we'll see.

Cheers,

VR
M4900 Kubota tractor
1994 Chevy S-10 4wd
1988 Chevy Suburban 4wd complete with factory Delco CB radio(....oops, just sold it)
1983 Isuzu Diesel PU
1970 Gamma Goat (finally sold the Goat, but I still have the stories)
1951 Norton International (in progress)
1951 Vincent Touring Rapide
1942 BSA WM-20 (uprated to M21 spec. 15hp)
1961 BSA A10 "Royal Tourist" (really)
And, lest we forget.... 2007 GearUp (Desert Camo "punkin orange")
User avatar
vincent-rapide
Hero of the Soviet Union - 2014
Hero of the Soviet Union - 2014
 
Posts: 325
Joined: Sun Jun 01, 2008 2:54 am
Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico & Medina, Texas

Postby vincent-rapide » Sun Sep 28, 2008 11:30 pm

OK, so based on the comments on the subject, I decided over the weekend to whittle a new brake fulcrum out of a piece of 1/4 mild steel plate. I did a rough cut with the torch and then used a vintage Atlas metal shaper, the grinder and some filing to get the needed profile.

The 1/4 inch plate is a perfect fit in the frame pivot mount and the new part seem quite substantial and up to the task....this is not a piece one would want to have fail at the wrong moment.....

The whole thing could be done with a hacksaw, file, and drill press if you have the patience.... Something I'm in short supply of

I made the distance between centers for pivot points on both arms of the new fulcrum the same, using the longer arm on the original as the pattern for centers, and the angle of the arm.

I have to say that based on my "seat of the pants" testing the braking force is improved. I can now apply enough pressure to force the rear tire to lock...with my foot on the footpeg, something that I could not do before. It "feels" like brake force is improved: the front end actually depresses with just the rear brake applied.

As an observation, there is just not much movement in the overall rear brake linkage that transmits back to the brake, in spite of the travel of the brake pedal. The next piece to lengthen would be the arm on the back side of the brake lever pivot, but that will be more of a project to make.

Still, all in all, the new fulcrum was worth the effort.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
M4900 Kubota tractor
1994 Chevy S-10 4wd
1988 Chevy Suburban 4wd complete with factory Delco CB radio(....oops, just sold it)
1983 Isuzu Diesel PU
1970 Gamma Goat (finally sold the Goat, but I still have the stories)
1951 Norton International (in progress)
1951 Vincent Touring Rapide
1942 BSA WM-20 (uprated to M21 spec. 15hp)
1961 BSA A10 "Royal Tourist" (really)
And, lest we forget.... 2007 GearUp (Desert Camo "punkin orange")
User avatar
vincent-rapide
Hero of the Soviet Union - 2014
Hero of the Soviet Union - 2014
 
Posts: 325
Joined: Sun Jun 01, 2008 2:54 am
Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico & Medina, Texas

Next

Return to Modifications & Accessories

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot], Yahoo [Bot] and 0 guests